Yaanai Kaapom

An Elephant Conservation Initiative

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Yaanai Kaapom

An Elephant Conservation Initiative
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TRAIN COLLISIONS

Threatening their survival. Elephant has been declared as the national heritage animal of India, which serves as an abode to Asiatic elephants. India’s economy is often referred to as the 'Elephant', implying a slow, yet powerful economy. Every year, a number of elephants sustain injuries and die after colliding with trains on railway tracks.
No mitigation solution has yet been shown to be effective.
India has the largest wild population of the Asian elephants— around 28,000 in number. A report by the Elephant Task force, commissioned by the Indian Ministry of Environment*, revealed that 150 elephants were recently crushed to death by speeding trains and this number is increasing everyday. The total number of Elephant Reserves (ERs) in the country has recently become 30 included in 14 states. In order to develop specific strategies and Standard Operating Procedures and for better coordination, committees have been constituted between Zonal Railway Offices and State Forest Departments

TRAIN COLLISIONS

Threatening their survival. Elephant has been declared as the national heritage animal of India, which serves as an abode to Asiatic elephants. India’s economy is often referred to as the 'Elephant', implying a slow, yet powerful economy. Every year, a number of elephants sustain injuries and die after colliding with trains on railway tracks.
No mitigation solution has yet been shown to be effective.
India has the largest wild population of the Asian elephants— around 28,000 in number. A report by the Elephant Task force, commissioned by the Indian Ministry of Environment*, revealed that 150 elephants were recently crushed to death by speeding trains and this number is increasing everyday. The total number of Elephant Reserves (ERs) in the country has recently become 30 included in 14 states. In order to develop specific strategies and Standard Operating Procedures and for better coordination, committees have been constituted between Zonal Railway Offices and State Forest Departments



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Yaanai Kaapom start: September 2017
Costs Phase 1 & 2: €125.000
No mitigation solution has yet been shown to be effective

India has the largest wild population of the Asian elephants— around 28,000 in number. A report by the Elephant Task force, commissioned by the Indian Ministry of Environment*, revealed that 150 elephants were recently crushed to death by speeding trains and this number is increasing everyday. The total number of Elephant Reserves (ERs) in the country has recently become 30 included in 14 states. In order to develop specific strategies and Standard Operating Procedures and for better coordination, committees have been constituted between Zonal Railway Offices and State Forest Departments

No mitigation solution has yet been shown to be effective

India has the largest wild population of the Asian elephants— around 28,000 in number. A report by the Elephant Task force, commissioned by the Indian Ministry of Environment*, revealed that 150 elephants were recently crushed to death by speeding trains and this number is increasing everyday. The total number of Elephant Reserves (ERs) in the country has recently become 30 included in 14 states. In order to develop specific strategies and Standard Operating Procedures and for better coordination, committees have been constituted between Zonal Railway Offices and State Forest Departments


The Yaanai Kaapom Initiative

Elephants produce social calls that can be detected by acoustic sensors at ranges of kilometers. Yaanai Kaapom will dispose a network of these sensor nodes along the railways to alert in real-time trains passing by so timely actions can be taken to prevent collisions.

The Yaanai Kaapom Initiative

Elephants produce social calls that can be detected by acoustic sensors at ranges of kilometers. Yaanai Kaapom will dispose a network of these sensor nodes along the railways to alert in real-time trains passing by so timely actions can be taken to prevent collisions.


What can be done?

Railway lines and other linear infrastructure projects run through the forests for thousands of kilometers affecting wildlife corridors. This causes the fragmentation of their habitat. Animals cross the tracks to reach nearby water bodies, or in search of food, and sometimes end up getting trapped. The steep embankments alongside the tracks make it even more difficult for the bulky and slow-moving animal to escape when a train approaches. It has also been reported that the frequency of accidents increased when tracks were converted from narrow gauge to standard gauge, allowing high speed trains to run. “While it is understandable that we don't want to compromise on developing infrastructure, let's make sure that we don't ignore our wildlife as well” (Shabdita Pareek).

What can be done?

Railway lines and other linear infrastructure projects run through the forests for thousands of kilometers affecting wildlife corridors. This causes the fragmentation of their habitat. Animals cross the tracks to reach nearby water bodies, or in search of food, and sometimes end up getting trapped. The steep embankments alongside the tracks make it even more difficult for the bulky and slow-moving animal to escape when a train approaches. It has also been reported that the frequency of accidents increased when tracks were converted from narrow gauge to standard gauge, allowing high speed trains to run. “While it is understandable that we don't want to compromise on developing infrastructure, let's make sure that we don't ignore our wildlife as well” (Shabdita Pareek).


THE YAANAI KAAPOM TECHNOLOGY

The technology behind Yaanai Kaapom was born in the ocean. Problems of collisions between sperm whales and ferries lead to develop a software package, called LIDO (listentothedeep.com) able to listen to sounds of the sea, extract signals from the whales and alert ships of their presence in real-time, thus allowing to prevent fatal encounters.
LIDO technology is now mature to be applied to elephant sounds and contribute to save them from collision.

THE YAANAI KAAPOM TECHNOLOGY

The technology behind Yaanai Kaapom was born in the ocean. Problems of collisions between sperm whales and ferries lead to develop a software package, called LIDO (listentothedeep.com) able to listen to sounds of the sea, extract signals from the whales and alert ships of their presence in real-time, thus allowing to prevent fatal encounters.
LIDO technology is now mature to be applied to elephant sounds and contribute to save them from collision.


HOW MUCH DOES THE YAANAI KAAPOM TECHNOLOGY COST?

Yaanai Kaapom proposes to structure the project in three phases. Phase 1 will see the deployment of 5 recorders at key spots along the railways to gather reference information on elephant sounds and train LIDO to automatically identify them apart in the jungle soundscape. Phase 1 duration is estimated to be six months. Phase 2 will integrate LIDO analysis in 1 real-time sound sensor node in one collision hotspot to demonstrate the Yaanai Kaapom concept: an alert system automatically received by trains that will timely reduce speed and avoid collisions.
Based on Phase 2, a network of Yaanai Kaapom nodes will be deployed at large geographical scales.
Phase 1 & 2 require a budget of around €125.000, Phase 3 costs and duration are to be determined.

HOW MUCH DOES THE YAANAI KAAPOM TECHNOLOGY COST?

Yaanai Kaapom proposes to structure the project in three phases. Phase 1 will see the deployment of 5 recorders at key spots along the railways to gather reference information on elephant sounds and train LIDO to automatically identify them apart in the jungle soundscape. Phase 1 duration is estimated to be six months. Phase 2 will integrate LIDO analysis in 1 real-time sound sensor node in one collision hotspot to demonstrate the Yaanai Kaapom concept: an alert system automatically received by trains that will timely reduce speed and avoid collisions.
Based on Phase 2, a network of Yaanai Kaapom nodes will be deployed at large geographical scales.
Phase 1 & 2 require a budget of around €125.000, Phase 3 costs and duration are to be determined.


THE YAANAI KAAPOM TEAM

Arun Krishnamurthy and Michel André are both Rolex Awards Laureates (http://rolexawards.com). Yaanai Kaapom represents their join effort to respond to the urgent necessity of addressing the elephant collision issue in India and contributing to the conservation of its biodiversity.
The Environmentalist Foundation of India (EFI, www.indiaenvironment.org/) will be in charge of building up a network of volunteers as well as rangers patrolling in the areas of collisions, as well as training them to operate the Yaanai Kaapom nodes.
The Sense of Silence Foundation (TSOSF) will adapt and deploy the LIDO technology to the elephant collision specificity and build up a webpage interface to access the data.

THE YAANAI KAAPOM TEAM

Arun Krishnamurthy and Michel André are both Rolex Awards Laureates (http://rolexawards.com). Yaanai Kaapom represents their join effort to respond to the urgent necessity of addressing the elephant collision issue in India and contributing to the conservation of its biodiversity.
The Environmentalist Foundation of India (EFI, www.indiaenvironment.org/) will be in charge of building up a network of volunteers as well as rangers patrolling in the areas of collisions, as well as training them to operate the Yaanai Kaapom nodes.
The Sense of Silence Foundation (TSOSF) will adapt and deploy the LIDO technology to the elephant collision specificity and build up a webpage interface to access the data.


Yaanai Kaapom start: September 2017
Costs Phase 1 & 2: €125.000
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"The Sense of Silence Foundation is giving Nature a powerful voice that everyone can hear"
- Michel André -